rss

IMCW News

This blog contains announcements, insights and articles from the Insight Meditation Community of Washington

Tara-Brach_2020_blog.png

Being a Mirror of Goodness: An Intention for the New Year

The medicine for our hurting world is love, and our loving becomes deeply healing when we see and reflect back the innate goodness of other beings. Jesuit priest and psychotherapist Anthony De Mello taught that the finest act of love you can offer is an act of seeing: “When you serve people, you help, support, comfort, alleviate pain. When you see people in their inner beauty and goodness, you transform and create.”
Athirapally_waterfall_by_Anna-Johns.png

The Art of Gratitude

In the mid-1970s, the girls of the Bethel Girls Orphanage in a remote village in the Indian state of Kerala, gathered in our Sunday-best to remember the generosity of American families for our Christmas. We had a plastic Christmas tree with ornaments from America, including my favorite: holly leaves with red berries. I had no idea these trees were real until I came to America. Our home in northern Virginia has one holly tree in front and one at the back of our house. I am grateful to these two trees for keeping me grounded and not letting a day go by without remembering how lucky I am to have gone from an orphanage in India to America....

Aspiring Allies Finding Our Way

In our Buddhist and mindfulness communities, there are many times that call for us to be allies to one another. My own aspiring ally journey has brought a lot of growth along with many setbacks; heart-felt intentions along with plenty of uncomfortable mistakes; and it continues to bring deeper, more real, loving, joyful relationships with folks in my life. On this journey I’ve been looking for freedom; freedom and justice for myself and for all beings. All of this is spiritual practice.....
Sun_thro_trees-9JxubXPaididg-unsplash.png

Joy is a Choice: Cultivating Joy & Savoring the Good

Despite the divisive times we find ourselves in, I believe there is one thing nearly all of us can agree on. Our nervous systems are getting more than their fair share of wear and tear these days. With an apparent oversupply of unpleasantness, these times are an easy set-up for negative emotional feedback loops that lead to escalating levels of anxiety and stress. It is a natural human tendency to avoid or resist the unpleasant, to run away from our fears. We raid the cookie jar, or much worse, which just adds fuel to the fire. What we resist, persists. This isn't good for our mental or physical health and, as a nurse practitioner and meditation teacher, I have found that many of us--myself included--become easily drained. We can't drink from an empty cup. Yet as caregivers, we keep on giving....With all this, there is good news. Antidotes exist that help us break out of our negativity bias. In times like these, I am reminded of how deeply grateful I am for my meditation practice.

Harriet Tubman: A Lesson in Moving Through the Unbearable

She is running in the darkness, a young Black woman, breathing hard, stumbling, but moving, moving in exhaustion and fear, but moving. It is dark, but she has a sense of where she is going. This is where I meet Harriet Tubman. This is how I came into practice. So often, the attention placed on Black bodies is focused on what we do with them or what is done to them. Too often, our hearts, our vision, and our spiritual practices are ignored as the action of our bodies are either praised or vilified. Harriet Tubman has become the epitome of Black woman as action hero....